#286 // Beauty in the bloom

Whew! What a week.

The snow stopped everything in much of the UK, as usual, and a cold bug stopped me in my tracks. I tried to go back to work after just a day off, but in truth, it's only a full week later that I'm feeling almost back to normal myself.

Given the weather is always a talking point for British people, and I actually felt overly warm in my winter coat today (so IT MAY ACTUALLY BE TIME TO PEEL OFF A LAYER - HOW EXCITING!), I thought now seemed like a good time to share one of two thoughts I'd had on blooming recently.

Gem from The Mother Cooker posted this tweet a while back. I really liked her perspective, so saved the tweet for more pondering.

If you think January is dreary, look around. New buds are on the trees, waiting for leaves to uncurl from hibernation. Frost glitters the ground like earth magic, the sun heats cold fences & they steam like hot kettles and the nights are getting just that little bit brighter.

Each day I walk through a park to my my new office, and I've been taking photos of the beginning shoots of the daffodils bursting through the soil. Come rain, shine, or snow, there they were, powering away - growing, doing, becoming.

We only tend to notice when the blossoms suddenly burst into pastel pinks and the daffodils put on their vibrant yellow dresses. But the bloom, and probably it's most powerful part, starts a long time before that.

The bloom begins when the seeds of whatever we're focusing on are sewn. When we make a decision, make a plan, take action and continue. And though it often goes unseen, there's so much beauty, power and determination in that. Your strides and efforts may only be for an audience of one at that point, but that's ok. You only need to show up for yourself anyway.

I know that for me, I spend a long time working on something and get to that moment of completion -  the bud, the fruit, the arrival! I'll have a great old time for all of two minutes and then it's onto the next thing. It's so fleeting. It's an issue in itself that I don't t spend more time taking up that space. 

We spend so much time grafting and growing and so little time in flower, or at the finish point in comparison, but we focus all our attention on the latter, instead of all of the effort it's taken us to get there.  

That's where the real celebration lies. 

Yes, there's beauty in the flowering and the fruit. But there's beauty in the bloom too.